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TEXT & TONIC - G H I May 28 2020, 0 Comments

I enjoy blogging about my design series because I’m learning about the lives of some fascinating women. And I've found that many of the textile patterns that we live with today were created in ancient times.

 

"Instant gratification is not soon enough." Meryl Streep

The worldwide popularity of the gingham pattern was originally developed in India and Indonesia, exported to Europe and into the American colonies in early 17th century. Now we find gingham everywhere; we wear it, sit on it, eat on it. It's on cars, on Easter eggs, and on statues. It's not just for cowgirls. 

 

 

 Dior car                                                           vintage gingham                             Into The Woods 
Meryl Streep, actor extraordinaire, has played many characters including a prime minister, a holocaust survivor, and a whistle blower. Her talents have been acknowledged by fans and peers alike, and she's seen as one of the best actors of her generation. With this kind of adoration, I think I can learn a lot from Meryl when I sit down with a bag of popcorn and explore her creativity in the world of cinema.

 

 

"If there's no chocolate in heaven, I'm not going."  Jane Seabrook

The use of the herringbone pattern dates back to the Roman Empire where it was used in roadway construction. Filippo Brunellechi's creation of the breathtaking cupola of Santa Maria del Fiore was made possible by using the herringbone brick pattern. 

   
Roman Road                                          Santa Maria del Fiore                      Furry Logic

Jane Seabrook is an illustrator and designer known for her detailed paintings of wildlife. Her watercolours of animals, which she pairs with quotes, speak to the human condition. We are encouraged to laugh and feel good, and get on with it.

 

 

"Nature is commonplace. Imitation is more interesting."  Gertrude Stein

The Ikat pattern employs the resist dyeing technique. Ikat textiles are created in many traditional textiles centres around the world. The characteristic fuzzy patterning is prized by many textile collectors.

   
Woven ikat fabric                               Gertrude Stein 1980 Andy Warhol          Checkerboard 1915 Juan Gris

Gertrude Stein was a modernist literary pioneer and an enthusiastic patron of avant-garde art. She was a leading figure of the pre-World War I art circles in Paris. Along with many others, the Cubist artist Juan Gris and Pablo Picasso, frequented Gertrude's Parisienne salon.

 

               

Here are a few of the many fun items now available on my website. I think you'll find something there to brighten your home.

 

I'm looking forward to sharing more about some fascinating women with you in the next blog: Text & Tonic J  K  L.

Until then.

Hasta luego amigos.

Val

 

 

 


TEXT & TONIC - A to Z May 07 2020, 0 Comments

It’s time celebrate Mother Earth’s gift of Spring: life’s eternal pattern of change and regeneration.

 

In the spirit of change, I’ve been inspired to create a colourful design series, using three features: pattern, the alphabet, and quotations.

I’ve chosen 26 patterns, starting with argyle ending with zigzag. The origins of these patterns are fascinating and I'm happy to share their story with you in my upcoming blog  series.

With each new design, a single letter is the visual focus. I've been inspired by artists who have used the alphabet in unique, creative ways. Illustrator Edward Gorey applied his style to a very enjoyable alphabet book called The Gashlycrumb Tinies.

 

Quotations are the third feature of this design project. I'll introduce you to some remarkable women who offer us their words of wisdom--some sincere, some hilarious. When Amelia Earhart in her quote tells us that "There's more to life than just being a passenger", we know she's telling us that we can be brave and we can fly on our own. I'm looking up, Amelia.

I'm looking forward to sharing my new designs with you beginning next Tuesday, May 12th. Until then....


Hasta luego,
Val